Categories

Child Protection Policy

Introduction


All sporting organisations which make provision for children and young people must ensure that:

  • the welfare of the child is paramount
  • all children, whatever their age, culture, disability, gender, language, racial origin religious beliefs and/or sexual identity have the right to protection from abuse
  • all suspicions and allegations of abuse and poor practice will be taken seriously and responded to swiftly and appropriately
  • all staff (paid/unpaid) working in sport have a responsibility to report concerns to the appropriate officer.

Staff/volunteers are not trained to deal with situations of abuse or to decide if abuse has occurred.


Policy statement/aims


The Karate Jutsu Associationhas a duty of care to safeguard all children involved in  The Karate Jutsu Association from harm. All children have a right to protection, and the needs of disabled children and others who may be particularly vulnerable must be taken into account. The Karate Jutsu Associationwill ensure the safety and protection of all children involved in The Karate Jutsu Association through adherence to the Child Protection guidelines adopted by The Karate Jutsu Association.

A child is defined as a person under the age of 18 (The Children Act 1989).

Policy aims

The aim of the The Karate Jutsu Association Child Protection Policy is to promote good practice:

  • providing children and young people with appropriate safety and protection whilst in the care of (Organisation/Club)
  • allow all staff /volunteers to make informed and confident responses to specific child protection issues.


Promoting good practice


Child abuse, particularly sexual abuse, can arouse strong emotions in those facing such a situation. It is important to understand these feelings and not allow them to interfere with your judgement about the appropriate action to take.

Abuse can occur within many situations including the home, school and the sporting environment. Some individuals will actively seek employment or voluntary work with young people in order to harm them. A coach, instructor, teacher, official or volunteer will have regular contact with young people and be an important link in identifying cases where they need protection. All suspicious cases of poor practice should be reported following the guidelines in this document.

When a child enters the club activity having been subjected to child abuse outside the sporting environment, sport can play a crucial role in improving the child’s self-esteem. In such instances the club activity organiser must work with the appropriate agencies to ensure the child receives the required support.